Virgo Funerals - incorporating South Burnett Funerals and Crematorium Pty Ltd
Serving the South Burnett with dignity since 1939
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Arrange A Funeral Online
If you're located far away from the South Burnett or - for any reason - can't make it to our offices, you can also arrange a funeral through us by simply completing our online form.

Services And Wakes
Funeral services vary widely depending on the wishes of the departed and their family.
Our quick guide explains the main types of services and different options for wakes.

Our Coffin Range
Virgo Funerals stock a range of beautiful, modern coffins to suit all tastes and budgets. While we encourage you to visit us to make you final selection, you can also view them online
by clicking here.

Memorials & Plaques
If you'd like to erect a personal memorial or plaque to your loved one, we have an extensive range of memorials and plaques to suit all tastes and budgets. You can view them by clicking here.

Making Arrangements
What's involved in making funeral arrangements? Most people have very little experience with this and can find it confusing. But our handy guide explains the process clearly and simply.

How To Cope With Grief
Death can take many people by surprise and very few of us are naturally good at dealing with it. Our tips will help you cope with grief (or help your family or friends to get through it).

What To Do When A Death Occurs
Death is a rare occurrence in most people's lives. So when it happens many people find themselves bewildered by it and unsure about what to do.

We hope these checklists will help answer many of the questions that most people have in these circumstances.

They explain what to do...

 

If The Death Occurs At Home
  • Call the deceased's doctor. Once the doctor has identified the deceased and is satisfied as to the cause of death a Cause of Death Certificate will be prepared. If the doctor hasn't attended the deceased in the past three months or if the doctor's uncertain about the exact cause of death then certification becomes a Coroner's matter.
     
  • After calling the doctor, call your family or a close friend for support and help in this difficult period when pressure may be placed on you to make a number of decisions.
     
  • While waiting for the doctor, you should also decide on a funeral director and make initial contact.
     
  • When the Cause of Death Certificate is issued, the funeral director can transport the deceased from the home to the funeral director's mortuary.
     
  • You'll then have to decide whether a burial or a cremation is required. If you decide on cremation, a doctor will be required to issue an Attending Practitioner's Certificate. Your funeral director will also assist you in completing two other forms:
    • a Registration of Death (as required by the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages) and...
    • if required, an Application for Cremation.
       
  • With the support of family or a friend, you'll then need to make a number of decisions about the funeral service itself. Your funeral director will usually guide you through these and they commonly include:
    • Newspaper notices
    • Style of casket
    • Where and when the service should take place
    • Burial or cremation arrangements
    • Clergy or celebrant
    • Floral tributes or charity donations
    • Transport arrangements

 

If The Death Occurs At A Hospital
  • After the medical staff at the hospital have satisfied the legal requirements regarding the cause of death and identity of the deceased, a medical certificate (a Cause of Death Certificate) will be given to you.
     
  • With the support of family or a close friend if possible, select a funeral director and ask that the deceased be transported to funeral director's mortuary.
     
  • You'll then have to decide whether a burial or a cremation is required. If you decide on cremation, a doctor will be required to issue an Attending Practitioner's Certificate. Your funeral director will also assist you in completing two other forms:
    • a Registration of Death (as required by the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages) and...
    • if required, an Application for Cremation.
       
  • With the support of family or a friend, a number of decisions will then have to be made about the funeral service itself. Your funeral director will usually guide you through these and they commonly include:
    • Newspaper notices
    • Style of casket
    • Where and when the service should take place
    • Burial or cremation arrangements
    • Clergy or celebrant
    • Floral tributes or charity donations
    • Transport arrangements

 

Accidental Or Sudden Unexplained Deaths
  • Call the police. Normally they'll arrange a government-contracted funeral director to take the deceased to a placed where an official examination can take place. The police will usually refer the matter to the Coroner, who'll prepare a report that will include a Certificate of Death and a Burial Order or a Cremation Permit. The Coroner's report may take a few days even when the matter is relatively straight-forward.
     
  • With support of family or a close friend you should then select a funeral director who would be able to inform you about what's happening in your particular circumstances. The funeral director will usually help and guide you through other matters that will require decisions, including:
    • Liasing with the Coroner's office on your behalf
    • Transporting the deceased to the funeral director's mortuary
    • Newspaper notices
    • Style of casket
    • Where and when the service should take place
    • Burial or cremation arrangements
    • Clergy or celebrant
    • Floral tributes or charity donations
    • Transport arrangements

 

If The Death Occurs In A Distant Place Or Country
  • With support of family or a close friend, select a local funeral director who should be able to advise you about the most cost-effective way to handle the matter.
     
  • In most countries, a death must be reported to a Coroner when:
    • A person has died suddenly and the cause is unknown
    • A person has died a violent or unnatural death
    • A medical practitioner hasn't issued a certificate stating the cause of death
    • The deceased person wasn't attended by a medical practitioner within three months immediately prior to their death
    • A person has died within 24 hours of - or as a result of - the administration of an anaesthetic (but not when a local anaesthetic was used for resuscitation)
    • A person has died within one year and one day of any accident to which the cause of death might be attributed
    • A person has died while in - or temporarily absent from - certain establishments that have been providing them with care, treatment and assistance (such as a hospital, a residential centre, a welfare facility or residential child care centre) or where...
    • A person has died while in police custody or while they were in - or temporarily absent from - a prison or a detention centre
    • An inquest must also be held where there is a death in custody or during a police operation.